The Pitch: The Back of My Burning Hand

The Pitch
The Back of My Burning Hand
(Self-Released)

The Back of My Burning Hand comes posthumously as The Pitch is no longer. They did, however reunite for a release show for this final album. An interesting move indeed, but after you hear their sophomore effort you will wish the five members of the band never parted ways. The Pitch offer a unique sound that is multi-influenced and they are not afraid to present a mixed bag of musical tricks.

The album weighs in heavy with the instrumental track “Build,” which is a captivating number that is well titled, because The Pitch builds on this one song to give the listener smore progressive titles. Like the first track, the next song is influenced by Pearl Jam’s later work. I could easily hear “This is What I Came For” as a b-side to the Binaural or Riot Act releases.

Vocalist/guitarist Ryan Lee is one of the key pieces to the puzzle comprised of The Pitch. His delicate inspiring song lyrics and layered guitars are forceful without being thrown in your face. His voice climbs the ladder of soft-spoken baritones to high-pitched wails and hollers to bring emotions in the songs at the right time. Simplicity is satisfying here.

”Loneliness Is a Virtue” showcases an Alice In Chains feel with epic proportions. Corey Anderson’s percussion and drumming bring this song to the forefront as one of the top songs of the album.

At times, as with “Pneuma” and “Be Thou My Vision,” The Pitch drastically changes up the pace of the album going from a multi-layered rock band to more of jam band. They pull off this genre well, but it isn’t their strong suit as they sound more akin to Dave Matthews or Creed.

The Back of My Burning Hand regains momentum with the final two cuts giving the listener seven emotional and varied numbers that one can sink their teeth in to.

As said before, Lee is one of the main pieces to this band, but you would be remised to overlook the violin playing of Sarah Kobylewski. She holds this band together with her amazing work. She is not prominent in every single song, but when she does take bow in hand, Kobylewski highlights every song.